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Fragment VI.

Among Christians it is settled as the doctrine of piety, that, according to nature itself, and to the activity and to whatever else pertains thereunto, God is equal and the same with Himself,17581758    ἵσον ἑαυτῷ καὶ ταυτόν. having nothing that is His unequal to Himself at all and heterogeneous.17591759    ἀκατάλληλον. If, then, according to Beron, the flesh that He assumed to Himself became possessed of the like natural energy with them, it is evident that it also became possessed of the like nature with Him in all wherein that nature consists,—to wit, non-origination, non-generation, infinitude, eternity, incomprehensibility, and whatever else in the way of the transcendent the theological mind discerns in deity; and thus they both underwent conversion, neither the one nor the other preserving any more the substantial relation of its own proper nature.17601760    τῆς ἰδίας φύσεως οὐσιώδη λόγον. For he who recognises an identical operation17611761    ταυτουργίαν. in things of unlike nature, introduces at the same time a fusion of natures and a separation of persons,17621762    διαίρεσιν προσωπικήν. their natural existence17631763    ὑπάρξεως. being made entirely undistinguishable by the transference of properties.17641764    ἱδιωμάτων.


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