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Chapter IV.—The God of the Law and the Prophets, and the Father of Our Lord Jesus Christ, is the Same God.

1.  Having now briefly arranged these points in order as we best could, it follows that, agreeably to our intention from the first, we refute those who think that the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ is a different God from Him who gave the answers of the law to Moses, or commissioned the prophets, who is the God of our fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.  For in this article of faith, first of all, we must be firmly grounded.  We have to consider, then, the expression of frequent recurrence in the Gospels, and subjoined to all the acts of our Lord and Saviour, “that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by this or that prophet,” it being manifest that the prophets are the prophets of that God who made the world.  From this therefore we draw the conclusion, that He who sent the prophets, Himself predicted what was to be foretold of Christ.  And there is no doubt that the Father Himself, and not another different from Him, uttered these predictions.  The practice, moreover, of the Saviour or His apostles, frequently quoting illustrations from the Old Testament, shows that they attribute authority to the ancients.  The injunction also of the Saviour, when exhorting His disciples to the exercise of kindness, “Be ye perfect, even as your Father who is in heaven is perfect; for He commands His sun to rise upon the evil and the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust,”21002100    Matt. v. 48, 45. most evidently suggests even to a person of feeble understanding, that He is proposing to the imitation of His disciples no other God than the maker of heaven and the bestower of the rain.  Again, what else does the expression, which ought to be used by those who pray, “Our Father who art in heaven,”21012101    Matt. vi. 9. appear to indicate, save that God is to be sought in the better parts of the world, i.e., of His creation?  Further, do not those admirable principles which 276He lays down respecting oaths, saying that we ought not to “swear either by heaven, because it is the throne of God; nor by the earth, because it is His footstool,”21022102    Matt. v. 34, 35. harmonize most clearly with the words of the prophet, “Heaven is My throne, and the earth is My footstool?”21032103    Isa. lxvi. 1.  And also when casting out of the temple those who sold sheep, and oxen, and doves, and pouring out the tables of the money-changers, and saying, “Take these things, hence, and do not make My Father’s house a house of merchandise,”21042104    John ii. 16. He undoubtedly called Him His Father, to whose name Solomon had raised a magnificent temple.  The words, moreover, “Have you not read what was spoken by God to Moses:  I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob; He is not a God of the dead, but of the living,”21052105    Matt. xxii. 31, 32; cf. Ex. iii. 6. most clearly teach us, that He called the God of the patriarchs (because they were holy, and were alive) the God of the living, the same, viz., who had said in the prophets, “I am God, and besides Me there is no God.”21062106    Isa. xlv. 6.  For if the Saviour, knowing that He who is written in the law is the God of Abraham, and that it is the same who says, “I am God, and besides Me there is no God, acknowledges that very one to be His Father who is ignorant of the existence of any other God above Himself, as the heretics suppose, He absurdly declares Him to be His Father who does not know of a greater God.  But if it is not from ignorance, but from deceit, that He says there is no other God than Himself, then it is a much greater absurdity to confess that His Father is guilty of falsehood.  From all which this conclusion is arrived at, that He knows of no other Father than God, the Founder and Creator of all things.

2.  It would be tedious to collect out of all the passages in the Gospels the proofs by which the God of the law and of the Gospels is shown to be one and the same.  Let us touch briefly upon the Acts of the Apostles,21072107    Acts vii. where Stephen and the other apostles address their prayers to that God who made heaven and earth, and who spoke by the mouth of His holy prophets, calling Him the “God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob;” the God who “brought forth His people out of the land of Egypt.”  Which expressions undoubtedly clearly direct our understandings to faith in the Creator, and implant an affection for Him in those who have learned piously and faithfully thus to think of Him; according to the words of the Saviour Himself, who, when He was asked which was the greatest commandment in the law, replied, “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.  And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.”  And to these He added:  “On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.”21082108    Matt. xxii. 37, 39, 40.  How is it, then, that He commends to him whom He was instructing, and was leading to enter on the office of a disciple, this commandment above all others, by which undoubtedly love was to be kindled in him towards the God of that law, inasmuch as such had been declared by the law in these very words?  But let it be granted, notwithstanding all these most evident proofs, that it is of some other unknown God that the Saviour says, “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart,” etc., etc.  How, in that case, if the law and the prophets are, as they say, from the Creator, i.e., from another God than He whom He calls good, shall that appear to be logically said which He subjoins, viz., that “on these two commandments hang the law and the prophets?”  For how shall that which is strange and foreign to God depend upon Him?  And when Paul says, “I thank my God, whom I serve in my spirit from my forefathers with pure conscience,”21092109    2 Tim. i. 3. he clearly shows that he came not to some new God, but to Christ.  For what other forefathers of Paul can be intended, except those of whom he says, “Are they Hebrews? so am I:  are they Israelites? so am I.”21102110    2 Cor. xi. 22.  Nay, will not the very preface of his Epistle to the Romans clearly show the same thing to those who know how to understand the letters of Paul, viz., what God he preaches?  For his words are:  “Paul, the servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, set apart to the Gospel of God, which He had promised afore by His prophets in the holy Scriptures concerning His Son, who was made of the seed of David according to the flesh, and who was declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead of Christ Jesus our Lord,”21112111    Rom. i. 1–4. etc.  Moreover, also the following, “Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn.  Doth God take care for oxen? or saith he it altogether for our sakes?  For our sakes, no doubt, this is written, that he that plougheth should plough in hope, and he that thresheth in hope of partaking of the fruits.”21122112    1 Cor. ix. 9, 10; cf. Deut. xxv. 4.  By which he manifestly shows that God, who gave the law on our account, i.e., on account of the apostles, says, “Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn;” whose care was not for oxen, but for the apostles, who were preaching the Gospel of 277Christ.  In other passages also, Paul, embracing the promises of the law, says, “Honour thy father and thy mother, which is the first commandment with promise; that it may be well with thee, and that thy days may be long upon the land, the good land, which the Lord thy God will give thee.”21132113    Eph. vi. 2, 3; cf. Ex. xx. 12.  By which he undoubtedly makes known that the law, and the God of the law, and His promises, are pleasing to him.

3.  But as those who uphold this heresy are sometimes accustomed to mislead the hearts of the simple by certain deceptive sophisms, I do not consider it improper to bring forward the assertions which they are in the habit of making, and to refute their deceit and falsehood.  The following, then, are their declarations.  It is written, that “no man hath seen God at any time.”21142114    John i. 18.  But that God whom Moses preaches was both seen by Moses himself, and by his fathers before him; whereas He who is announced by the Saviour has never been seen at all by any one.  Let us therefore ask them and ourselves whether they maintain that He whom they acknowledge to be God, and allege to be a different God from the Creator, is visible or invisible.  And if they shall say that He is visible, besides being proved to go against the declaration of Scripture, which says of the Saviour, “He is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of every creature,”21152115    Col. i. 15. they will fall also into the absurdity of asserting that God is corporeal.  For nothing can be seen except by help of form, and size, and colour, which are special properties of bodies.  And if God is declared to be a body, then He will also be found to be material, since every body is composed of matter.  But if He be composed of matter, and matter is undoubtedly corruptible, then, according to them, God is liable to corruption!  We shall put to them a second question.  Is matter made, or is it uncreated, i.e., not made?  And if they shall answer that it is not made, i.e., uncreated, we shall ask them if one portion of matter is God, and the other part the world?  But if they shall say of matter that it is made, it will undoubtedly follow that they confess Him whom they declare to be God to have been made!—a result which certainly neither their reason nor ours can admit.  But they will say, God is invisible.  And what will you do?  If you say that He is invisible by nature, then neither ought He to be visible to the Saviour.  Whereas, on the contrary, God, the Father of Christ, is said to be seen, because “he who sees the Son,” he says, “sees also the Father.”21162116    John xiv. 9.  This certainly would press us very hard, were the expression not understood by us more correctly of understanding, and not of seeing.  For he who has understood the Son will understand the Father also.  In this way, then, Moses too must be supposed to have seen God, not beholding Him with the bodily eye, but understanding Him with the vision of the heart and the perception of the mind, and that only in some degree.  For it is manifest that He, viz., who gave answers to Moses, said, “You shall not see My face, but My hinder parts.”21172117    Ex. xxxiii. 20, cf. 23.  These words are, of course, to be understood in that mystical sense which is befitting divine words, those old wives’ fables being rejected and despised which are invented by ignorant persons respecting the anterior and posterior parts of God.  Let no one indeed suppose that we have indulged any feeling of impiety in saying that even to the Saviour the Father is not visible.  Let him consider the distinction which we employ in dealing with heretics.  For we have explained that it is one thing to see and to be seen, and another to know and to be known, or to understand and to be understood.21182118    Aliud sit videre et videri, et aliud nôsse et nosci, vel cognoscere atque cognosci.  To see, then, and to be seen, is a property of bodies, which certainly will not be appropriately applied either to the Father, or to the Son, or to the Holy Spirit, in their mutual relations with one another.  For the nature of the Trinity surpasses the measure of vision, granting to those who are in the body, i.e., to all other creatures, the property of vision in reference to one another.  But to a nature that is incorporeal and for the most part intellectual, no other attribute is appropriate save that of knowing or being known, as the Saviour Himself declares when He says, “No man knoweth the Son, save the Father; nor does any one know the Father, save the Son, and he to whom the Son will reveal Him.”21192119    Matt. xi. 27.  It is clear, then, that He has not said, “No one has seen the Father, save the Son;” but, “No one knoweth the Father, save the Son.”

4.  And now, if, on account of those expressions which occur in the Old Testament, as when God is said to be angry or to repent, or when any other human affection or passion is described, (our opponents) think that they are furnished with grounds for refuting us, who maintain that God is altogether impassible, and is to be regarded as wholly free from all affections of that kind, we have to show them that similar statements are found even in the parables of the Gospel; as when it is said, that he who planted a vineyard, and let it out to husbandmen, who slew the servants that were sent to them, and at last put to death even the son, 278is said in anger to have taken away the vineyard from them, and to have delivered over the wicked husbandmen to destruction, and to have handed over the vineyard to others, who would yield him the fruit in its season.  And so also with regard to those citizens who, when the head of the household had set out to receive for himself a kingdom, sent messengers after him, saying, “We will not have this man to reign over us;”21202120    Luke xix. 14. for the head of the household having obtained the kingdom, returned, and in anger commanded them to be put to death before him, and burned their city with fire.  But when we read either in the Old Testament or in the New of the anger of God, we do not take such expressions literally, but seek in them a spiritual meaning, that we may think of God as He deserves to be thought of.  And on these points, when expounding the verse in the second Psalm, “Then shall He speak to them in His anger, and trouble them in His fury,”21212121    Ps. ii. 5. we showed, to the best of our poor ability, how such an expression ought to be understood.


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