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Chapter XXVI.

“We must,” he says, “observe the laws, not only because it has occurred to the mind of others to decide some things differently, but because it is a duty to protect what has been enacted for the public advantage, and also because, in all probability, the various quarters of the earth were from the beginning allotted to different superintending spirits, and were distributed among certain governing powers, and in this manner the administration of the world is carried on.”  Thus Celsus, as if he had forgotten what he had said against the Jews, now includes them in the general eulogy which he passes upon all who observe their ancestral customs, remarking:  “And whatever is done among each nation in this way, would be rightly done whenever agreeable to the wishes (of the superintendents).”  And observe here, whether he does not openly, so far as he can, express a wish that the Jew should live in the observance of his own laws, and not depart from them, because he would commit an act of impiety if he apostatized; for his words are:  “It would be an act of impiety to get rid of the institutions established from the beginning in the various places.”  Now I should like to ask him, and those who entertain his views, who it was that distributed the various quarters of the earth from the beginning among the different superintending spirits; and especially, who gave the country of the Jews, and the Jewish people themselves, to the one or more superintendents to whom it was allotted?  Was it, as Celsus would say, Jupiter who assigned the Jewish people and their country to a certain spirit or spirits?  And was it his wish, to whom they were thus assigned, to enact among them the laws which prevail, or was it against his will that it was done?  You will observe that, whatever be his answer, he is in a strait.  But if the various quarters of the earth were not allotted by some one being to the various superintending spirits, then each one at random, and without the superintendence of a higher power, divided the earth according to chance; and yet such a view is absurd, and destructive in no small degree of the providence of the God who presides over all things.

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