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Chapter LII.

But the statement of Celsus which we wish to examine at present is the following:  “Let us then pass over the refutations which might be adduced against the claims of their teacher, and let him be regarded as really an angel.  But is he the first and only one who came (to men), or were there others before him?  If they should say that he is the only one, they would be convicted of telling lies against themselves.  For they assert that on many occasions others came, and sixty or seventy of them together, and that these became wicked, and were cast under the earth and punished with chains, and that from this source originate the warm springs, which are their tears; and, moreover, that there came an angel to the tomb of this said being—according to some, indeed, one, but according to others, two—who answered the women that he had arisen.  For the Son of God could not himself, as it seems, open the tomb, but needed the help of another to roll away the stone.  And again, on account of the pregnancy of Mary, there came an angel to the carpenter, and once more another angel, in order that they might take up the young Child and flee away (into Egypt).  But what need is there to particularize everything, or to count up the number of angels said to have been sent to Moses, and others amongst them?  If, then, others were sent, it is manifest that he also came from the same God.  But he may be supposed to have the appearance of announcing something of greater importance (than those who preceded him), as if the Jews had been committing sin, or corrupting their religion, or doing deeds of impiety; for these things are obscurely hinted at.”

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