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Chapter XXXIX.

I do not think it necessary to grapple with an argument advanced not in a serious but in a scoffing spirit, such as the following:  “If the mother of Jesus was beautiful, then the god whose nature is not to love a corruptible body, had intercourse with her because she was beautiful;” or, “It was improbable that the god would entertain a passion for her, because she was neither rich nor of royal rank, seeing no one, even of her neighbours, knew her.”  And it is in the same scoffing spirit that he adds:  “When hated by her husband, and turned out of doors, she was not saved by divine power, nor was her story believed.  Such things,” he says, “have no connection with the kingdom of heaven.”  In what respect does such language differ from that of those who pour abuse on others on the public streets, and whose words are unworthy of any serious attention?

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