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CONTENTS

Preparatory Considerations — Of the antecedent Credibility of Miracles.
PART 1.
OF THE DIRECT HISTORICAL EVIDENCE OF CHRISTIANITY, AND WHEREIN IT IS DISTINGUISHED FROM THE EVIDENCE ALLEGED FOR OTHER MIRACLES.
Proposition stated
PROPOSITION I.

That there is satisfactory Evidence, that many professing to be original Witnesses of the Christian Miracles passed their Lives in Labours, Dangers, and Sufferings, voluntarily undergone in Attestation of the Accounts which they delivered, and solely in consequence of their Belief of those Accounts; and that they submitted, from the same Motives, to new Rules of Conduct.

  CHAPTER I

Evidence of the Suffering of the first Propagators of Christianity, from the Nature of the Case.

CHAPTER II

Evidence of the Sufferings of the first Propagators of Christianity, from Profane Testimony.

CHAPTER III

Indirect Evidence of the Sufferings of the first Propagators of Christianity, from the Scriptures and other ancient Christian Writings.

CHAPTER IV

Direct Evidence of the same.

CHAPTER V

Observations upon the preceding Evidence.

CHAPTER VI

That the Story for which the first Propagators of Christianity suffered was miraculous.

CHAPTER VII

That it was, in the main, the Story which we have now proved by indirect Considerations.

CHAPTER VIII

The same proved from the Authority of our Historical Scriptures.

CHAPTER IX

Of the Authenticity of the historical Scriptures, in eleven Sections

 

SECT. 1 Quotations of the historical Scriptures by ancient Christian Writers.

SECT. 2 Of the peculiar Respect with which they were quoted.

SECT. 3 The Scriptures were in very early Times collected into a distinct Volume.

SECT. 4 And distinguished by appropriate Names and Titles of Respect.

SECT. 5 Were publicly read and expounded in the religious Assemblies of the early Christians.

SECT. 6 Commentaries, &c., were anciently written upon the Scriptures.

SECT. 7 They were received by ancient Christians of different Sects and persuasions.

SECT. 8 The four Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, thirteen Epistles of St. Paul, the first Epistle of John, and the first of Peter, were received without doubt by those who doubted concerning the other Books of our present Canon.

SECT. 9 Our present Gospels were considered by the adversaries of Christianity as containing the Accounts upon which the Religion was founded.

SECT. 10 Formal Catalogues of authentic Scriptures were published, in all which our present Gospels were included.

SECT. 11 The above Propositions cannot be predicated of those Books which are commonly called Apocryphal Books of the New Testament.

Recapitulation.

CHAPTER X.

OF THE DIRECT HISTORICAL EVIDENCE OF CHRISTIANITY, AND WHEREIN IT IS DISTINGUISHED FROM THE EVIDENCE ALLEGED FOR OTHER MIRACLES.

PROPOSITION II.
  CHAPTER I

That there is not satisfactory Evidence, that Persons pretending to be original Witnesses of any other similar Miracles have acted in the same Manner, in Attestation of the Accounts which they delivered, and solely in consequence of their Belief of the Truth of those Accounts.

CHAPTER II

Consideration of some specific Instances

PART II.
OF THE AUXILIARY EVIDENCES OF CHRISTIANITY,
  CHAPTER I

Prophecy

CHAPTER II

The Morality of the Gospel

CHAPTER III

The Candour of the Writers of the New Testament

CHAPTER IV

Identity of Christ’s Character

CHAPTER V

Originality of our Saviour’s Character

CHAPTER VI

Conformity of the Facts occasionally mentioned or referred to in Scripture with the State of things in these Times, as represented by foreign and independent Accounts.

CHAPTER VII

Undesigned Coincidences.

CHAPTER VIII

Of the History of the Resurrection.

CHAPTER IX
 

Of the Propagation of Christianity.

SECT. 2 Reflections upon the preceding Account.

SECT. 3 Of the Religion of Mahomet.

PART III
A BRIEF CONSIDERATION OF SOME POPULAR OBJECTIONS.
  CHAPTER I

The Discrepancies between the several Gospels.

CHAPTER II

Erroneous Opinions imputed to the Apostles.

CHAPTER III

The Connection of Christianity with the Jewish History.

CHAPTER IV

Rejection of Christianity.

CHAPTER V

That the Christian Miracles are not recited, or appealed to, by early Christian Writers themselves, so fully or frequently as might have been expected.

CHAPTER VI

Want of Universality in the Knowledge and Reception of Christianity, and of greater Clearness in the Evidence.

CHAPTER VII

Supposed effects of Christianity.

CHAPTER VIII

Conclusion.

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