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Sect. CXLVIII. — THIS also, is no powerless thunder-bolt where the apostle says, “All have sinned and are without the glory of God: for there is no difference.” (Rom. iii. 23).

What, I pray you, could be spoken more clearly? Produce one of your “Free-will” workmen, and say to me — does this man, sin in this his endeavour? If he does not sin, why does not Paul except him? Why does he include him also without difference? Surely he that saith “all,” excepts no one in any place, at any time, in any work or endeavour. If therefore you except any man, for any kind of devoted desire or work, — you make Paul a liar; because he includes that “Free-will” — workman or striver, among all the rest, and in all that he saith concerning them; whereas, Paul should have had some respect for this person, and not have numbered him among the general herd of sinners!

There is also that part, where he saith, that they are “without the glory of God.”

You may understand “the glory of God” here two ways, actively and passively. For Paul writes thus from his frequent use of Hebraisms. “The glory of God,” understood actively, is that glory by which God glories in us; understood passively, it is that glory by which we glory in God. But it seems to me proper, to understand it now, passively. So, “the faith of Christ,” is, according to the Latin, the faith which Christ has; but, according to the Hebrew, “the faith of Christ,” is the faith which we have in Christ. So, also, “the righteousness of God,” signifies, according to the Latin, the righteousness which God has; but according to the Hebrews, it signifies the righteousness which we have from God and before God. Thus also “the glory of God,” we understand according to the Latin, not according to the Hebrew; and receive it as signifying, the glory which we have from God and before God; which may be called, our glory in God. And that man glories in God who knows, to a certainty, that God has a favour unto him, and deigns to look upon him with kind regard; and that, whatever he does pleases God, and what does not please him, is borne with by Him and pardoned.

If therefore, the endeavour or desire of “Free-will” be not sin, but good before God, it can certainly glory; and in that glorying, say with confidence, — This pleases God, God favours this, God looks upon and accepts this, or at least, bears with it and pardons it. For this is the glorying of the faithful in God: and they that have not this, are rather confounded before God. But Paul here denies that these men have this; saying, that they are all entirely without this glory.

This also experience itself proves. — Put the question to all the exercisers of “Free-will” to a man, and see if you can shew me one, who can honestly, and from his heart, say of any one of his devoted efforts and endeavours, — This pleases God! If you can bring forward a single one, I am ready to acknowledge myself overthrown, and to cede to you the palm. But I know there is not one to be found. And if this glory be wanting, so that the conscience dares not say, to a certainty, and with confidence, — this pleases God, it is certain that it does not please God. For as a man believes, so it is unto him: because, he does not, to a certainty, believe that he pleases God; which, nevertheless, it is necessary to believe; for to doubt of the favour of God, is the very sin itself of unbelief; because, He will have it believed with the most assuring faith that He is favourable. Therefore, I have convinced them upon the testimony of their own conscience, that “Free-will,” being “without the glory of God,” is, with all its powers, its devoted strivings and endeavours, perpetually under the guilt of the sin of unbelief.

And what will the advocates of “Free-will” say to that which follows, “being justified freely by His grace?” (Rom. iii. 24). What is the meaning of the word “freely?” What is the meaning of “by His grace?” How will merit, and endeavour, accord with freely-given righteousness? But, perhaps, they will here say — that they attribute to “Free-will” a very little indeed, and that which is by no means the ‘merit of worthiness’ (meritum condignum!) These, however, are mere empty words: for all that is sought for in the defence of “Free-will,” is to make place for merit. This is manifest: for the Diatribe has, throughout, argued and expostulated thus,

- “If there be no freedom of will, how can there be place for merit? And if there be no place for merit, how can there be place for reward? To whom will the reward be assigned, if justification be without merit?

Paul here gives you an answer. — That there is no such thing as merit at all; but that all who are justified are justified “freely;” that this is ascribed to no one but to the grace of God. — And when this righteousness is given, the kingdom and life eternal are given with it! Where is your endeavouring now? Where is your devoted effort? Where are your works? Where are your merits of “Free-will?” Where is the profit of them all put together? You cannot here make, as a pretence, ‘obscurity and ambiguity:’ the facts and the works are most clear and most plain. But be it so, that they attribute to “Free-will” a very little indeed, yet they teach us that by that very little we can attain unto righteousness and grace. Nor do they solve that question, Why does God justify one and leave another? in any other way, than by asserting the freedom of the will, and saying, Because, the one endeavours and the other does not: and God regards the one for his endeavouring, and despises the other for his not endeavouring; lest, if he did otherwise, He should appear to be unjust.

And notwithstanding all their pretence, both by their tongue and pen, that they do not profess to attain unto grace by ‘the merit of worthiness’ (meritum condignum) nor call it the merit of worthiness, yet they only mock us with a term, and hold fast their tenet all the while. For what is the amount of their pretence that they do not call it ‘the merit of worthiness,’ if nevertheless they assign unto it all that belongs to the merit of worthiness? — saying, that he in the sight of God attains unto grace who endeavours, and he who does not endeavour, does not attain unto it? Is this not plainly making it to be the merit of worthiness? Is it not making God a respecter of works, of merits, and of persons to say that one man is devoid of grace from his own fault, because he did not endeavour after it, but that another, because he did endeavour after it, has attained unto grace, unto which he would not have attained, if he had not endeavoured after it? If this be not ‘the merit of worthiness,’ then I should like to be informed what it is that is called ‘the merit of worthiness.’

In this way you may play a game of mockery upon all words; and say, it is not indeed the merit of worthiness, but is in effect the same as the ‘merit of worthiness.’ — The thorn is not a bad tree, but is in effect the same as a bad tree! — The fig is not a good tree, but is in effect the same as a good tree! — The Diatribe is not, indeed, impious, but says and does nothing but what is impious!

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