Way to Divine Knowledge

by William Law


Enter your search query for this book.
Results will appear here as you type.
Page loading...
Summary Formats Reviews About the author Annotations

Summary

William Law's career was one of many changes. He wore many hats: teacher, religious guide, dissenter, and mystic writer. This last shift from traditional, evangelical treatise and doctrine writer to student and scholar of mysticism is perhaps the most curious. After almost a decade of silence from his pen, Law published several volumes of Christian mystical study, one of which was Way to Divine Knowledge. The piece is a dialogue among speakers Academicus, Rusticus, Humanus, and Theophilus. They discuss the spiritual yearning that humans have deep within, and the importance of divine union. "Your business is now to give Way to this heavenly Working of the Spirit of God in your Soul, and turn from every things either within you, or without you, that may hinder the farther Awakening," says Theophilus in the first dialogue. This literature from Law's later work is a creative and readable discussion of Christian mystic union, and will be instructive for readers interested in the more intangible side of union with God.

Abby Zwart
CCEL Staff Writer
Popularity User ratings Year written
36%
Popularity is calculated by comparing this book's number of views to our most commonly read book.
379 ad

Available formats

Kindle
iBook
ePUB
PDF
Plain text
Read online Read on mobile device Download

Reviews

Minimum rating:
Reviews provided by goodreads.com

There are currently no reviews for this book on goodreads.com. You can be the first to write one here.

About William Law
View author page »

Born: 1686
Died: April 9, 1761
Related topics: Bo?hme, Jakob,--1575-1624, Christian life, Christianity, Clergy, Early works
Basic information: William Law (1686 – 9 April 1761) was an English cleric, divine and theological writer.
Popular works: Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life, AN APPEAL To all that Doubt, Way to Divine Knowledge, DEMONSTRATION of the Gross and Fundamental Errors, Humble, Affectionate, and Earnest Address to the Clergy

Annotations

Login to make annotations and highlights while reading a book.




Advertisements