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CHAPTER XXIX

Of a vision which was seen after his death, and of the great glory which he attained.

(1)

THERE was, in the city of Gorichem, a certain man named John Hermann, whose life was good and his reputation honourable, and his wife was called Jutta. These two did alike live after the commandments of God, and drew many others to 148serve Him; they did often talk together of God upon holy days in their own house, and gladly snowed hospitality to many Religious who came to visit them. Both of these were well known to Florentius, and learned from him the manner of holy conversation, and they set an example of life before their neighbours.

Now shortly after the death of Florentius, the aforesaid John did also depart from this world, and on a certain day, Jutta, who was most devout toward God, was occupied with prayer in her chamber. And having finished her devotion she arose to go forth from her chamber, and as she was opening the door she suddenly heard the window of the room open behind her.

(2) Looking back therefore she saw some one enter by the window who was clad round with a glory of light and most lovely to look upon, being in face like her husband, and she said, “Art thou there, John, my beloved husband?” and that other replied, “It is I, but call me no more thy husband”; and Jutta asked, “How is it with thee?” and he answered, “I am saved, and I enjoy the happiness of Heaven and the Presence of God.” Then Jutta asked, “And how is it with our father, Lord Florentius?” and he answered, “Florentius hath a glory that is truly great; and all his works were found to be upright and good,” and he added, “Remain thou in this house and change not thine abode, for thou shalt die ere long; and tell this to Adelaide the daughter of Thomas, the Superior of the Sisterhood,” and then the Vision departed. After these things Jutta spent the rest of her days, though they were but few, with a heart so fervent toward God that all worldly things seemed to her but as worthless dung; and 149it is manifest by this sign alone, that the aforesaid vision was no vain deceit, but an heavenly revelation sent by God.

(3) When one asked concerning the great glory of Florentius, it was answered to him, “It was chiefly because of three virtues. First, that great love which he had toward God, referring to Him as the Final cause of all the good things which he had, and in all things seeking His Honour and good pleasure. Secondly, that zeal for souls which he had toward his neighbours, in that he sought the salvation of all, and eagerly led them to God’s service. Thirdly, because of his deep humility and contempt of himself, in that he always thought little and slightingly of himself.” These three things appear clearly and distinctly enough in his life, which is here written, and there are many of the faithful who are not ignorant thereof.

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