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Practical Observations.

1. It is not strange that some bad professors creep into the church, since one in twelve, even of Christ's own disciples, was false. The church can prosper in spite of some unworthy members.

2. We see the powerlessness of mere good example to save men. No one ever lived in better company than Judas.

3. Bad men will always find an opportunity to sin. God uses even bad men, and compels them to carry out his designs; but wrong-doing is none the better on that account.

4. THIS CUP.—When Jesus, in his prayer, said, “Not as I will, but as thou wilt,” then he was “strengthened,” his soul was at peace, and henceforth he was calm and dignified. He was brought into the perfect peace and calmness of a submissive will, so that every desire and feeling and choice was in harmony with the Father. He was enabled to go on with his work of redemption, to glorify God and magnify his love (see Phil. 2:7–10). The cross was changed to a crown, Gethsemane into Paradise, death into immortal glory. So perfect resignation to the will of the Father strengthens us, fills us with perfect peace, and fits us for every noble work.

5. I AM HE.—That answer, so quiet and so gentle, had in it a strength greater than the eastern wind, or the voice of thunder, for God was in that still voice and it struck them down to the ground. Instances are not wanting in history in which the untroubled brow, the mere glance, the calm bearing of a defenceless man, has disarmed and paralyzed enemies. The savage and brutal Gauls could not lift their swords to slay the majestic senators of Rome. “I cannot slay Marius!” exclaimed the barbarian slave, flinging down his sword and flying headlong from the prison into which he had been sent to murder the aged hero.—Farrar.

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