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Du bist zwar mein und bleibest mein.--(Goed. 100.)

[For the Bereaved.]

This is a beautiful hymn for consolation of parents on the loss of a son The occasion of the poem was the death of Constantin Andreas, younger son of Johannes Berkov, pastor of St. Mary's Church, Berlin. It was first printed as one of the Dulcia amicorum solatia at the end of the funeral sermon by Georg Lilius, Berlin, 1650. Included in Ebeling, 1667, 6, no. 72, in 12 stanzas.

English Versions:
1. Thou'rt mine, yes, still thou art mine own.

Miss Winkworth, in her Lyra Ger., 1858, p. 123.

2. Yes, thou art mine, still mine, my son.

J. D. Burns, in the Family Treasury, p. 8, and his Remains, 1869, p. 249.

3. Mine art thou still, and mine shalt be.

J. Kelly, 1867, p. 333.

51
4. Thou art mine own, art still mine own.

Dr. J. Guthrie, 1869, p. 100.

Selected Stanza:
1. Thou'rt mine, yes, still thou art mine own!
Who tells me thou art lost?
But yet thou art not mine alone,
I own that He who cross'd
My hopes, hath greatest right in thee;
Yea, though He ask and take from me
Thee, O my son, my heart's delight,
My wish, my thought, by day and night.
Miss Winkworth, 1858.
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