« Prev Contents Next »

CONTENTS.

LECTURE I.

MORAL GOVERNMENT.

Definition of the term law. — Distinction between physical and moral law. — The essential attributes of moral law. — Subjectivity. — Objectivity. — Liberty, as opposed to necessity. — Fitness. — Universality. — Impartiality. — Practicability. — Independence. — Immutability. — Unity. — Expediency. — Exclusiveness

1

LECTURE II.

MORAL GOVERNMENT — Continued.

Definition of the term government. — Distinction between moral and physical government. — The fundamental reason of moral government. — Whose right it is to govern. — What is implied in the right to govern. — The limits of this right. — Moral obligation. — The conditions of moral obligation

6

LECTURE III.

MORAL OBLIGATION.

Man a subject of moral obligation. — Extent of moral obligation 19

LECTURE IV.

FOUNDATION OF MORAL OBLIGATION.

What is intended by the foundation of moral obligation. — Self-evident principles. — That the sovereign will of God is not the foundation of moral obligation. — The theory of Paley. — The utilitarian philosophy

27

LECTURE V.

FOUNDATION OF MORAL OBLIGATION. FALSE THEORIES.

Right as the foundation of obligation 38

LECTURE VI.

FOUNDATION OF MORAL OBLIGATION. FALSE THEORIES.

The goodness or moral excellence of God as the foundation of obligation 49
xvi

LECTURE VII.

FOUNDATION OF MORAL OBLIGATION. FALSE THEORIES.

Moral order as the foundation of obligation. — The nature and relations of moral beings as the true foundation of obligation. — Moral obligation as founded in the idea of duty. — The complexity of the foundation of obligation. — Summing up

64

LECTURE VIII.

FOUNDATION OF MORAL OBLIGATION. PRACTICAL BEARINGS OF THE DIFFERENT THEORIES.

The theory that regards the sovereign will of God as the foundation of moral obligation. — The theory of the selfish school. — The natural and necessary results of utilitarianism. — Practical bearings and tendency of rightarianism. — The practical bearings of the true theory of the foundation of obligation

80

LECTURE IX.

UNITY OF MORAL ACTION.

What constitutes obedience to moral law. — Obedience cannot be partial. — Possible suppositions. — Objections considered

95

LECTURE X.

OBEDIENCE ENTIRE.

Nothing virtue but obedience to the law of God. — No rule of duty but moral law: Condition of justification

115

LECTURE XI.

OBEDIENCE TO THE MORAL LAW.

What is not implied in entire obedience to the law of God 124

LECTURE XII.

ATTRIBUTES OF LOVE.

Certain facts revealed in consciousness. — Attributes of that love which constitutes obedience to the law. — Voluntariness. — Liberty. — Intelligence. — Virtuousness. — Disinterestedness. — Impartiality. — Universality

135

LECTURE XIII.

ATTRIBUTES OF LOVE — Continued.

Efficiency. — Complacency. — Opposition to sin. — Compassion 145
xvii

LECTURE XIV.

ATTRIBUTES OF LOVE — Continued.

Mercy. — Justice. — Veracity 157

LECTURE XV.

ATTRIBUTES OF LOVE — Continued.

Patience. — Meekness. — Self-denial. — Condescension. — Stability. — Holiness, or Purity

166

LECTURE XVI.

DISOBEDIENCE TO MORAL LAW.

What disobedience to moral law cannot consist in. — What disobedience to moral law must consist in

180

LECTURE XVII.

ATTRIBUTES OF SELFISHNESS.

Voluntariness. — Liberty. — Intelligence. — Unreasonableness. — Interestedness. — Partiality. — Efficiency. — Opposition to benevolence or to virtue. — Cruelty. — Injustice

183

LECTURE XVIII.

ATTRIBUTES OF SELFISHNESS — Continued.

Falsehood, or lying. — Pride. — Intemperance. — Total moral depravity 196

LECTURE XIX.

SANCTIONS OF MORAL LAW.

What constitutes the sanctions of law. — In what light sanctions are to be regarded. — Duration of the penal sanctions of the law of God

208

LECTURE XX.

HUMAN GOVERNMENT.

Me ultimate end of God in Creation. — Providential and moral governments indispensable to the highest good of the universe. — Human governments a necessity of human nature. — This necessity will continue as long as human beings exist in this world. — Human governments are plainly recognized in the Bible as a part of the moral government of God. — Objections answered. — The limits of the right of government

214
xviii

LECTURE XXI.

HUMAN GOVERNMENT — Continued.

No form of civil government universally obligatory. — Revolutions. — In what cases human legislation is valid, and in what cases it is null and void. — The rights and duties of governments and subjects in relation to the execution of the penalties of law

222

LECTURE XXII.

MORAL DEPRAVITY.

Definition. — Distinction between physical and moral depravity. — Mankind both physically and morally depraved. — Moral depravity of mankind universal. — Moral depravity total

228

LECTURE XXIII.

MORAL DEPRAVITY — Continued.

Proper method of accounting for moral depravity. — Dr. 'Woods' view of physical and moral depravity examined. — Standards of the Presbyterian Church examined 235

LECTURE XXIV.

MORAL DEPRAVITY — Continued.

Further arguments in support of the position that human nature is in itself sinful. — The proper method of accounting for moral depravity. — Summary of the truth on this subject — Remarks 245

LECTURE XXV.

ATONEMENT.

Established governmental principles. — The term atonement. — Affirmations of reason upon the subject. — The fact of atonement. — Christ's obedience did not constitute the atonement. — The atonement not a commercial transaction. — The atonement a satisfaction of public justice 258

LECTURE XXVI.

EXTENT OF ATONEMENT.

For whose benefit the atonement was intended. — Objections answered 274

LECTURE XXVII.

REGENERATION.

The common distinction between regeneration and conversion. — The assigned reasons for this distinction. — Objections to this distinction. — What regeneration xixis. — The universal necessity of regeneration. — Agencies employed in regeneration. — Instrumentalities employed in the work. — The subject both passive and active. — What is implied in regeneration 282

LECTURE XXVIII.

REGENERATION — Continued.

Different theories of regeneration examined. — The taste scheme. — The divine efficiency scheme. — The susceptibility scheme. — Theory of a divine moral suasion. — Objections to this theory. — Remarks 291

LECTURE XXIX.

EVIDENCES OF REGENERATION.

Wherein saints and sinners may agree. — Remarks 300

LECTURE XXX.

EVIDENCES OF REGENERATION — Continued.

Wherein saints and sinners must differ 309

LECTURE XXXI.

NATURAL ABILITY.

The Edwardean notion of ability and of natural inability. — Natural ability identical with freedom or liberty of will. — The human will free. — Moral inability according to the Edwardean school. — This distinction between natural and moral inability nonsensical. — Fundamental error of the Edwardean school on the subject of ability. — Another scheme of inability 320

LECTURE XXXII.

GRACIOUS ABILITY.

What is intended by the term. — This doctrine absurd. — In what sense a gracious ability is possible 341

LECTURE XXXIII.

THE NOTION OF INABILITY.

Proper mode of accounting for it 353

LECTURE XXXIV.

REPENTANCE AND IMPENITENCE.

What repentance is not, and what it is. — What is implied in it. — What impenitence is not. — What it is. — Some things that are implied in it. — Some evidences of ft 364
xx

LECTURE XXXV.

FAITH AND UNBELIEF.

What evangelical faith is not. — What it is. — What is implied in it. — What unbelief is not. — What it is. — What is implied in it. — Conditions of both faith and unbelief. — The guilt of unbelief. — Consequences of both faith and unbelief 373

LECTURE XXXVI.

JUSTIFICATION.

What justification is not.—What it is. — Conditions of justification. — Foundation of justification 382

LECTURE XXXVII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Some points that have been settled. — Definition of terms. — The real question. — Entire sanctification attainable in this life 402

LECTURE XXXVIII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Paul entirely sanctified 423

LECTURE XXXIX.

SANCTIFICATION.

Conditions of its attainment. — Relations of Christ to the soul 433

LECTURE XL.

SANCTIFICATION.

Objections answered 448

LECTURE XLI.

SANCTIFICATION.

Objections continued 462

LECTURE XLII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Remarks 472
xxi

LECTURE XLIII.

Election 481

LECTURE XLIV.

Reprobation 499

LECTURE XLV.

Divine Sovereignty 515

LECTURE XLVI.

Purposes of God 524

LECTURE XLVII.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

The different kinds of certainty. — What is not intended by the perseverance of the saints 544

LECTURE XLVIII.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

The doctrine proved 554

LECTURE XLIX.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Further proof 563

LECTURE L.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Objections considered 585

LECTURE LI.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Further objections 605
xxii1
« Prev Contents Next »
Please login or register to save highlights and make annotations
Corrections disabled for this book
Proofing disabled for this book
Printer-friendly version





Advertisements



| Define | Popups: Login | Register | Prev Next | Help |