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I. To whom this precept is addressed,

Beyond question, the precept is addressed to all who are under obligation to be benevolent; therefore, to all classes and all beings upon whom the law of love is imposed. Consequently, it is addressed to all human beings, for all who are human bear moral responsibility—ought to care for the souls of their fellows, and of course fall under the broad sweep of this requisition.

Note the occasion of Christ’s remark. He was traversing the cities and villages of His country, “teaching in their synagogues and preaching the Gospel of the kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people.” He saw multitudes before Him, mostly in great ignorance of God and salvation; and His deeply compassionate heart was moved,” because He saw them fainting and scattered abroad as sheep without a shepherd.” Alas! they were perishing for lack of the bread of heaven, and who should go and break it to their needy souls?

His feelings were the more affected because He saw that they felt hungry. They not only were famishing for the bread of life, but they seemed to have some consciousness of the fact. They were just then in the condition of a harvest-field, the white grain of which is ready for the sickle, and waits the coming of the reapers. So the multitudes were ready to be gathered into the granary of the great Lord of the harvest. No wonder this sight should touch the deepest compassions of His benevolent heart.

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