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Preface

I THINK the best thing I can do, if I must make a Preface, is to print this letter from Baxter’s small brother to another boy:

Dear Charlie,

Would you believe it? some fellow’s written a Book about Fred! I think he’s in an awful wax. N.B. The Book’s a swindle. Except the story of a Castle (and one about a soldier or something) it’s all yarn. I’ve not read it. What a licking we gave the Junior Pelican! I made 13, but they bowl frightful sneaks. Please tell Whitemouse to send me the crib to Caesar instanter.

Yours ever,

MIKE.

P.S.—Don’t cut me for sending that book about Fred. I had to. And for any sake don’t open it till Sunday.

P.P.S.—Monday. I’ve read it. It gets awfully serious some places. By the way, tell Whitemouse never to mind that crib just now.

M.

“To acquire all round proficiency, I am strongly convinced that constant practice and sound coaching have all to do with it.”

W. G. GRACE, Cricket, p. 221.

“I do not sympathise with the batsman who plays only to keep up his wicket and does not try to hit, but I do sympathise with those who, not possessing great hitting power, keep adding quietly, though slowly, to the score as best they can.”

The Same, p. 222.

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