Discourse Concerning the Being and Attributes of God, the Obligations of Natural Religion, and the Truth and Certainty of the Christian Revelatio

by Samuel Clarke


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Summary

Samuel Clarke not only worked alongside Isaac Newton as a mathematician and physicist, but he also gave several important lectures in the field of philosophical theology. A Discourse Concerning the Being and Attributes of God argues for God’s existence in a similar fashion that one would argue for a mathematical principle. Scottish philosopher David Hume would later criticize Clarke’s argument and general approach to theological discourse. Although Hume’s critique is better known, Clarke’s original writing provides the reader a direct view into the theologian’s mind rather than through the filter of Hume’s commentary.

Kathleen O’Bannon
CCEL Staff
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About Samuel Clarke
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Samuel Clarke
Source: Wikipedia
Source: Wikipedia
Born: October 11, 1675
Died: May 17, 1729
Related topics: Clarke, Samuel,--1675-1729, Collection of papers which passed between the late Mr. Leibniz and Dr. Clarke in the years 1715 and 1716 (Clarke, Samuel), Early works, History, Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm,--Freiherr von,--1646-1716
Basic information: Samuel Clarke (11 October 1675, Norwich – 17 May 1729, London) was an English philosopher and Anglican clergyman.
Popular works: Discourse Concerning the Being and Attributes of God, the Obligations of Natural Religion, and the Truth and Certainty of the Christian Revelatio

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