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Lecture One Hundred and Tenth

The Prophet taught us yesterday, that we ought to allow God his right of speaking to us, and of sustaining us by his own word, until the ripe time shall come, when he shall really fulfill what he has promised. Then an exhortation follows, added at the close of the verse—that we are to exercise patience; and the Apostle also, referring to this passage in Hebrews 10:38, makes a similar application. He indeed quotes what we shall find in the next verse, ‘The just by his faith shall live;’ but he had in view the whole context; and at the same time he reminds us of the Prophet’s object here in exalting the authority of God’s word. The exhortation, then, is briefly this—that though God may keep us in suspense, we yet ought not to cast away hope, for he knows when it is expedient for us that he should stretch forth his hand. And as there are two clauses, as I said yesterday, which seem at first sight to be inconsistent the one with the other, the Prophet very fitly joins them together, and considers them to be in perfect harmony; for though God may appear to delay, yet he is not slower than what is necessary and expedient. Let us then be fully persuaded that there is in God prudence and wisdom enough to assist us as soon as it may be needful. The Prophet now reminds us that it is no wonder if God seems to us to delay, for we are too hasty in our desires. Let therefore this fervor be restrained, so that we may subject our feelings to the providence and purpose of God. Let us now proceed—

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