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VII

From all this, and from what went before, it must be very obvious to everyone that more than the Filioque contention separates the Greek from the Roman Church. They are diverse in spirit and totally irreconcilable in doctrine and practice. They are in reality two Churches--have been so from the first, and must to all appearance continue so to the end. Nor are we very hopeful that more than a very sympathetic interest in the great apostolic Church can ever result from an increased knowledge of that Church on the part of the Reformed communions of the West--and surely that 58 may be attained; but we must look beyond the self-assertive Roman Church, and by earnest enquiry seek to acquaint ourselves with its history, doctrine, and practice. Such a study will reward us by creating a lasting bond of sympathy with that Church, and by broadening our outlook, which has in the past been too much confined within the limits of the horizon bounding our own communion--a narrowing and pride engendering condition in truth. And from the varied contents of the voluminous service books of the Greek Church--the work of devoted men in the early centuries, who lived so near to the source of our common Christianity--may be culled many flowers with which to beautify the temple of God in these latter days. A specimen of what those books contain may be seen in the contents of this volume.

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