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THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE COLOSSIANS - Chapter 3 - Verse 3

Verse 3. For ye are dead. Dead to the world; dead to sin; dead to earthly pleasures. On the meaning of the word dead, See Barnes "Ro 6:2"; See Barnes "Eph 2:1".

The idea of the apostle is, that as Christ became literally dead in the tomb, so we, in virtue of our connexion with him, have become dead to sin, to worldly influences, pleasures, and ambition. Or, in other words, we are to be to them as if we were dead, and they had no more influence over us than the things of earth had over him in the grave. See Barnes "Ro 6:2".

 

And your life. There is still life. Though dead to one class of objects, you are alive to others. See the sentiment here expressed explained at large See Barnes "Gal 2:20".

 

Is hid with Christ in God. The language here is taken probably from treasure which is "hid" or concealed in a place of security; and the idea is, that eternal life is an invaluable jewel or treasure, which is laid up with Christ in heaven where God is. There it is safely deposited. It has this security, that it is with the Redeemer, and that he is in the presence of God; and thus nothing can reach it or take it away. It is not left with us, or entrusted to our keeping—for then it might be lost, as we might lose an invaluable jewel; or it might be wrested from us; or we might be defrauded of it; but it is now laid up far out of our sight, and far from the reach of all our enemies, and with One who can "keep that which we have committed to him against that day," 2 Ti 1:12. Our eternal life, therefore, is as secure as it could possibly be made. The true condition of the Christian is, that he is "dead" to this world, but that he has immortal life in prospect, and that is secure, being in the holy keeping of his Redeemer, now in the presence of God. From this it follows that he should regard himself as living for heaven.

{d} "ye are dead" Ro 6:2

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