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EPHESIANS - Chapter 4 - Verse 30

Verse 30. And grieve not the holy Spirit of God. This is addressed to Christians, and it proves that it is possible for them to grieve the Holy Spirit. The word here used—lupeite, means, properly, to afflict with sorrow; to make sad or sorrowful. It is rendered, to make sorry, or sorrowful, Mt 14:9; 17:23; 18:31; 19:22; 26:22,37

Mr 14:19; Joh 16:20; 2 Co 2:2; 6:10; 7:8,9,11; 1 Th 4:13.

It is rendered grieved, Mr 10:22; Joh 21:17; Ro 14:15; 2 Co 2:4,5; Eph 4:30; and once, "in heaviness," 1 Pe 1:6. The verb does not elsewhere occur in the New Testament. The common meaning is, to treat others so as to cause grief. We are not to suppose that the Holy Spirit literally endures grief, or pain, at the conduct of men. The language is such as is fitted to describe what men endure, and is applied to him to denote that kind of conduct which is fitted to cause grief; and the meaning here is, "do not pursue such a course as is fitted, in its own nature, to pain the benevolent heart of a holy being. Do not act towards the Holy Spirit in a manner which would produce pain in the bosom of a friend who loves you. There is a course of conduct which will drive that Spirit from the mind as if he were grieved and pained—as a course of ingratitude and sin would pain the heart of an earthly friend, and cause him to leave you." If asked what that conduct is, we may reply,

(1.) Open and gross sins. They are particularly referred to here; and the meaning of Paul is, that theft, falsehood, anger, and kindred vices, would grieve the Holy Spirit, and cause him to depart.

(2.) Anger, in all its forms. Nothing is more fitted to drive away all serious and tender impressions from the mind than the indulgence of anger.

(3.) Licentious thoughts and desires. The Spirit of God is pure, and he dwells not in a soul that is filled with corrupt imaginings.

(4.) Ingratitude. We feel ingratitude more than almost anything else; and why should we suppose that the Holy Spirit would not feel it also?

(5.) Neglect. The Spirit of God is grieved by that. Often he prompts us to pray; he disposes the mind to seriousness, to the perusal of the Bible, to tenderness and penitence. We neglect those favoured moments of our piety, and lose those happy seasons for becoming like God.

(6.) Resistance. Christians often resist the Holy Ghost. He would lead them to be dead to the world; yet they drive on their plans of gain. He would teach them the folly of fashion and vanity; yet they deck themselves in the gayest apparel. He would keep them from the splendid party, the theatre, and the ballroom; yet they go there. All that is needful for a Christian to do, in order to be eminent in piety, is to yield to the gentle influences which would draw him to prayer and to heaven.

Whereby ye are sealed. See Barnes "2 Co 1:22".

 

Unto the day of redemption. See Barnes "Eph 1:14".

 

{a} "grieve not" Isa 63:10 {b} "unto the day" Eph 1:13,14

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