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THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES - Chapter 16 - Verse 12

Verse 12. And from thence to Philippi. The former name of this city was Dathos. It was repaired and adorned by Philip, the father of Alexander the Great, and after him was called Philippi. It was famous for having been the place where several battles were fought in the civil wars of the Romans; and, among others, for the decisive battle between Brutus and Antony. At this place Brutus killed himself. To the church in this place Paul afterwards wrote the epistle which bears its name.

Which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia. This whole region had been conquered by the Romans under Paulus Emilius. By him it was divided into four parts or provinces. (Livy.) The Syriac version renders it, "a city of the first part of Macedonia;" and there is a medal extant which also describes this region by this name. It has been proposed, therefore, to alter the Greek text in accordance with this, since it is known that Amphipolis was made the chief city by Paulus Emilius. But it may be remarked, that although Amphipolis was the chief city in the time of Paulus Emilius, it may have happened that in the lapse of two hundred and twenty years from that time, Philippi might have become the most extensive and splendid city. The Greek here may also mean simply that this was the first city to which they arrived in their travels.

And a colony. This is a Latin word, and means that this was a Roman colony. The word denotes a city or province which was planted or occupied by Roman citizens. On one of the coins now extant, it is recorded that Julius Caesar bestowed the advantages and dignity of a colony on Philippi, which Augustus afterwards confirmed and augmented. See Rob. Cal., Art. Philippi.

Certain days. Some days.

{d} "Philippi, which is the chief city" Php 1:1 {1} "the chief city" "the first" {+} "certain days" "Some"

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