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THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES - Chapter 4 - Verse 24

Verse 24. They lifted up their voice. To lift up the voice, among the Hebrews, was a phrase denoting either an address to the people, Jud 9:7, or a phrase expressive of weeping, Ge 29:11; Jud 2:4; Ru 1:9; 1 Sa 24:16, or was expressive of prayer. To lift up the voice to God means, simply, they prayed to him.

With one accord. Unitedly. Properly with one mind, or purpose. See Barnes "Ac 1:14".

The union of the early Christians is often noticed in the Acts of the Apostles. Thus far there was no jar or dissension in their society, and everything has the appearance of the most entire affection and confidence.

Lord. Greek, despota. From this word is derived the word despot.

This is not the usual word employed by which to address God. The word commonly translated Lord is Kuriov. The word here used denotes one who rules over others, and was applied to the highest magistrate or officer. It denotes authority, power, absoluteness in ruling. It is a word denoting more authority in ruling than the other. That more commonly denotes a property in a thing; this denotes absolute rule. It is applied to God, in Lu 2:29; Re 6:10; Jude 1:4

to Jesus Christ, 2 Pe 2:1; to masters, 1 Ti 6:1; Tit 2:9; 1 Pe 2:18; to husbands, 1 Pe 3:6; and to a possessor or owner, 2 Ti 2:21.

Thou art God. This ascription of praise seems to have been designed to denote their sense of his power to deliver them; and his right to dispose of them. They were employed in his service; they were encompassed with dangers; and they acknowledged him as their God, who had made all things, and who had an entire right to direct, and to dispose of them for his own glory, in times of danger and perplexity we should remember that God has a right to do with us as he pleases; and we should go cheerfully and commit ourselves into his hands.

Which hast made, etc. Ge 1. This passage is taken directly from Ps 146:6; comp. Re 14:7.

{c} "Lord, thou art God" 2 Ki 19:15

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