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THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW - Chapter 11 - Verse 30

Verse 30. My yoke is easy, etc. That is, the services that I shall require are easily rendered. They are not burdensome, like all other systems of religion. So the Christian always finds them. In coming to him, there is a peace which passeth all understanding; in believing in him, joy; in following him through evil and good report, a comfort which the world giveth not; in bearing trials, and in persecution, the hope of glory; and in keeping his commandments, great reward.

{g} "my yoke is easy" 1 Jn 5:3

 

REMARKS ON MATTHEW CHAPTER 11

(1.) Anxiety about the person and works of Christ is peculiarly proper, Mt 11:2,3. John was solicitous to ascertain his true character; and nothing is of more importance for all, than to understand his true character and will. On him depends all the hope that man has of happiness beyond the grave. He saves, or man must perish. He will save, or we must die for ever. With what earnestness, therefore, should the old and the young inquire into his character and will! Our eternal all demands it; and while this is delayed, we are endangering our everlasting felicity.

(2.) Clear proof has been furnished that Jesus is the Christ, and can save us, Mt 11:4,5. If his miracles did not prove that he came from God, nothing can prove it. If he could open the eyes of the blind, then he can enlighten the sinner; if he could unstop the ears of the deaf, then he can cause us to hear and live; if he could heal the sick, and make the lame walk, then he can heal our spiritual maladies, and make us walk in the way of life; if he could raise the dead, then he can raise those dead in sin, and breathe into us the breath of eternal life. If he was willing to do all this for the body, which is soon to die, then he will be much more willing to do it for the soul, that never dies. Then the poor lost sinner may come and live.

(3.) We see, in this chapter, Christ's manner of praising or Complimenting men, Mt 11:7-15. He gave, in no measured terms, his exalted opinion of John; gave him praise which had been bestowed on no other mortal; ranked him far above the purest and sublimest of the prophets. But this was not, done in the presence of John; nor was it done in the presence of those who would inform John of it. It was when the disciples of John had "departed," and his commendation of John was spoken to "the multitude," Mt 11:7. He waited till his disciples were gone, apprehending doubtless that they would be likely to report what he said in praise of their master, and then expressed his high opinion of his character. The practice of the world is to praise others to their faces, or in the presence of those who will be sure to inform them of it, and to speak evil of them when absent. Jesus delivered his unfavourable opinions of others to the men themselves, their excellences he took pains to commend where they would not be likely to hear of them. He did good to both; and in both prevented the existence of pride.

(4.) The wicked take much pains, and are often fickle and inconsistent, for the sake of abusing and calumniating religious men, Mt 11:18,19. They found much fault with our Saviour for doing the very same thing which they blamed John for not doing. So it is commonly with men who slander professors of religion. They risk their own characters to prove that others are hypocrites, or sinners. The object is not truth, but calumny, and opposition to religion; and hitherto no means have been too base, or too wicked, to pour contempt on the followers of Christ.

(5.) The purest characters may expect the shaft of calumny and malice; and often in proportion to their purity, Mt 11:19. Even the Saviour of the world was accused of being intemperate, and a glutton. If the only perfectly pure Being that ever trod the earth was thus accused, let not his followers think that any strange thing has happened to them, if they are falsely accused.

(6.) Judgments will overtake guilty men, and cities, and nations, Mt 11:21,22. They fell on Sodom, Tyre, Sidon, and Capernaum. They may long linger; but in due time the hand of God will fall on the wicked, and they will die, for ever die.

(7.) The wicked will suffer in proportion to their privileges, Mt 11:23,24. So it was with Capernaum. And if they of ancient days suffered thus; if more tremendous judgments fell on them than even on guilty Sodom, what shall be the doom of those who go down to hell from this day of light? The Saviour was indeed there a few days; he worked a few miracles: but they had not, as we have, all his instructions; they had not Sabbath-schools, and Bible-classes, and the stated preaching of the gospel; nor was the world blessed then as now with extensive and powerful revivals of religion. How awful must be the doom of those who are educated in the ways of religion; who are instructed from sabbath to sabbath; who grow up amidst the means of grace, and then are lost!

(8.) The poor and needy; the weary and heavy laden; the soul sick of sin and the world, conscious of guilt, and afraid to die, may come to Jesus Christ, and live, Mt 11:28-30. The invitation is wide as the world. The child and the old man may seek and find salvation at the feet of the same Saviour. No age is too young; no sinner is too old. Christ is full of mercy, and all who come shall find peace. Oh, how should we, in this sinful and miserable world, borne down with sin, and exposed each moment to death, how should we come and find the peace which he has promised to all! and take the yoke which all have found to be light!

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